Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Adam Roscoe; Gary Kinsman; Hazel Simpson; Dave Wilcox; Keven Law; .



Plan your time in London!
@www.ravishlondon.com

****************************

Seven (and with time fourteen) different ways in which you can spend a day in London:

Each day gives you attractions to visit in one area. So you can minimise your travel time.

With each day you get

  • A list of activities.

  • A map.

  • Transport details.

  • Opening times (approximate - please check link for exact times).

  • Prices (approximate - please check link for exact price)

  • Contact details if you want to book tickets and restaurants in advance.

Click here for help on

"
Monday

On the South Bank: A Day With Old Father Thames

  • Spend a day strolling along the south bank of the River Thames the most delightful part of London.

  • The South Bank will bewilder you with its architectural diversity and the variety of plays, shows and concerts.

  • But more than anything it is the perfect place for a languid or romantic stroll. There is nothing more relaxing than watching Old Father Thames rolling on by.

  • Although the day starts with old London, i.e. the Tower Bridge Exhibition, its main focus is modern London; the Tate Modern, the Design Museum and Norman Foster's London City Hall.

  • You'll get the chance to dine next to the Thames, first at Butler's Wharf Chop House, where you can experience British food and later on at the Oxo Tower, with its beautiful views of the city.

  • End the night taking in a play, show or concert.

In Pictures

" "
Tube to Tower Hill42m above the Thames at Tower Bridge Exhibition.Cool trends at Design Museum

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
toastbrot81.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
toastbrot81.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
miss modular.


Lunch at Butlers Wharf Chop HouseStroll past Norman Foster's London City HallTour the The William Shakespeare Globe Theatre

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
Gary Kinsman.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
Pamela Millar.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
TGI Greeny.


Feel engulfed by the Tate Modern Art galleryDine al fresco with views Oxo TowerStunts and jumps at the South Bank Skate Park

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
John Hedges.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
International Diabetes Foundation.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
MsHaniaK.


Play, show or concert at the National Theatre; South Bank Centre; or Shakespeare Globe Theatre.Evening stroll along the South BankBack home via Waterloo Tube Station

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
photographer695.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
Gary Kinsman.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
toastbrot81.


"

In Detail

  1. Get the Circle Line to Tower Hill and then walk to Tower Bridge.

  2. At Tower Bridge take the Tower Bridge Exhibition which takes you 42m above the Thames, and gives you marvellous views of the surrounding city.

  3. Then cross the bridge and walk around the suprisingly serene environment of Shad Thames, a complex of old dockyards, which has been converted into office blocks, bars and includes the Design Museum, which features some of the latest contemporary designs.

  4. Afterwards, take a stop off at Butlers Wharf Chop House for your first taste of British cuisine. You heard British food was awful not put it to the test!

  5. After lunch stroll along westwards along the South Bank. You'll walk past Norman Foster's London City Hall building, a post-modern egg shaped structure, and take a coffee in the lower ground floor cafe if you wish.

  6. Continue westwards and you'll pass the Shakespeare Globe Theatre, a reconstruction of Shakespeare's theatre that was built nearby. You can take a tour or book tickets for a show if you like.

  7. You must visit the Tate Modern, a supersized art gallery housed in an old power station. Its got loads of stuff to see for free, including a section on Dali. A gigantic exhibit usually sits inside the museum's industrial sized turbine hall.

  8. Its also really nice to take in the skate park for ten minutes. The park is built into the underside of one of the nearby buildings. You can see BMXers and skate boarders pulling off tricks within their graffiti strewn cave. Its a great antidote to the high end culture which sets the tone for the area.

  9. If you've got a bit of money to burn its well worth visiting the Oxo Tower, where you can get a cocktail or a meal, and enjoy some of the best view of London.

  10. For the evening you are spoilt for theatre, plays and shows, as this area hosts the South Bank Centre, the National Theatre and The Shakespeare Globe Theatre. Check the websites out for whats going on and try to book tickets in advance.

  11. Alternatively you can do what hundreds of tourists and locals love to do, stroll lazily towards the London Eye, feeling relaxed by the Thames, engaged by the peope who pass you by and amused by the many street entertainers who throng the South Bank.

  12. Whatever you do, taking in the South Bank is a great way to spend your first day in London!

"

On a Map

Morning

Tube to Tower Hill.
42m above the Thames at Tower Bridge Exhibition.
Cool trends at Design Museum.
Afternoon

Lunch at Butlers Wharf Chop House.
Stroll past Norman Foster's City Hall.
Tour the William Shakespeare Globe Theatre.
Feel engulfed by the Tate Modern Art gallery.
Evening

Dine al fresco with views - Oxo Tower.
Stunts, jumps and moves at the Skate Park.
Concert at the South Bank Centre.
Play at the William Shakespeare Globe Theatre.
Back home via Waterloo Tube Station.



View Monday - modern London along the South Bank in a larger map

" "

Attractions one by one



Tower Bridge Exhibition
http://www.towerbridge.org.uk/NR/rdonlyres/E5EDF48C-1AB3-4F49-9B0B-DAC53A515CC9/0/TowerBridgeLeaflet.pdf

Find yourself elevated 42 metres above the River Thames. Take the Tower Bridge Exhibition.+

10-6.00, Adult 7 Child 3 Family 11, Tower Hill (Circle & District)

Tower Bridge, London
;
020 7403 3660
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Neil Henderson; .





Design Museum
http://designmuseum.org/exhibitions

Forget the antiquated relics in most of London's museums. Start your holiday with a refreshing view on contemporary design at the Design Museum, located on the South Bank of the Thames. +

10am - 5.45pm, 8, Tower Hill (Circle & District)

Shad Thames, City of London SE1 2YD
;
020 7403 6933
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
miss modular; .





Butlers Wharf Chop House
http://www.chophouse-restaurant.co.uk/restaurant/

Get your first mouthful of British cuisine - you heard it was digusting - now put the theory to the test! Butlers Wharf sources its food from all across the UK. Expect salmon, mussels and beef amongst other dishes+

Lunch-time menu, Lunch 23-27, London Bridge (Northern Line), Tower Hill (City & District)

36e Shad Thames, City of London, Greater London SE1 2YE
;
020 7403 3403
0


Tate Modern
http://www.tate.org.uk/modern/exhibitions/

The most exciting thing to visit in London. Based in an old power station next to the Thames it exemplifies the way in which London recycles itself, retaining its heritage, whilst adapting to new times. The Tate Modern has an incredible range of art and sculptures on show. But its piece de resistance has always been the huge exhibition that always fills its cavernous tubine hall. Well worth a visit, and I'd check the book shop out too.+

10-6.00, Free*, London Bridge; Waterloo; Southwark

Bankside, London SE1
;
020 7887 8888
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Craig White; .





Shakespeare's Globe Theatre Tour and Exhibition
http://www.shakespeares-globe.org/exhibitiontour/

Shakespeare's Globe Theatre is a reconstruction of Shakespear's original London theatre. Theatre lovers may be interested in the tour and exhibition of the theatre. Theatre season opens in April 2011.+

10-5.30, Adult 12 Child 7 Family 32, London Bridge

21 New Globe Walk, City of London SE1 9DT
;
020 7902 1400
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Greg Robleto; .





Shakespeare's Globe Theatre
http://www.shakespeares-globe.org/theatre/annualtheatreseason/

Shakespeare's Globe Theatre is a reconstruction of Shakespear's original London theatre.Theatre season opens in April 2011.+

2011 Programme, 0, London Bridge

21 New Globe Walk, City of London SE1 9DT
;
020 7902 1400
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
David Lewis Baker; .





The National Theatre
http://www.nationaltheatre.org.uk/

The National Theatre is housed in one South Bank's challenging 1960s concrete sandwiches. A strange sight. It offers several different plays at any one time. Well worth a visit.+

Programme of shows, 0, Waterloo (Northern Line)

South Bank, London SE1 9PX
;
020 7452 3000
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
strangebehaviour; .





South Bank Centre
http://www.southbankcentre.co.uk/find/all

Dance & performance, music and opera! The South Bank Centre is a collection of institutional cultural heavyweights. These include the Royal Festival Hall, the Hayward Gallery and the Queen Elizabeth Hall. There's a huge number of events laid on. Some are free. Check the website and book your tickets in advance.+

Programme of shows, 0, Waterloo (Northern Line)

South Bank, London SE1 9PX
;
020 8332 5000
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
strangebehaviour; photographer695; .





The Oxo Tower Restaurant, Bar and Brasserie
http://www.harveynichols.com/restaurants/oxo-tower-london

Iconic bar situated at the top of residential flats in what used to be an old power station. Get stunning views of the Thames and London, but only if you book a seat in the restaurant. If you've got money its a great place to dine. Otherwise have a drink and enjoy other enjoying the view.+

Sample dinner menu, 90 per person, Waterloo

OXO Tower Wharf , Barge House Street Street South Bank , London SE1 9PH
;
020 7803 3888
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
beakerpics; Michiel Souren; .





Skateboarding Park


Stunts, tricks and posing from London's skaters and bikers. Great place for action photographs. The raw energy is a fanastic complement to the high end culture offered in these parts. Like going to the Opera and bumping into the Beastie Boys on the way.+

, , Waterloo (Northern Line)

;
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
tomgsonine; Angus Sung; .





London City Hall
http://www.london.gov.uk/city-hall/visitor-information/educational-visits

Feel a frisson of excitement on encountering one of Norman Foster's several offbeat offerings, which has helped to keep London at the forefront of post-modern architectural development. This building helped to bring London into the 21st Century. Educational visits for students only. The Deli Cafe is open 8-5 to the public on weekdays.+

Deli Café, lower ground floor, 8-5, Mon-Fri, , London Bridge (Nothern Line)

City Hall, The Queen's Walk, Greater London SE1 2AA
;
020 7983 4000
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
tk21hx; .





Walking the South Bank
0

Strolling along the South Bank to Waterloo is one of the best ways of enjoying the River Thames. It’s the perfect setting for the end to a day out in London, or a romantic date. Expect street entertainers, lots of people watching and beautiful views of the Thames.+

, , Waterloo

South Bank , London SE1 9PH
;
0
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Gary Kinsman; .





" "

Print off 'text-only version' + map
"

"
Tuesday

The Royal, The Real, The Ritz and The Glitz!

  • Spend most part of the day rubbing shoulders with London's elite, before mixing it up with the common man in the evening.

  • This tour starts at Big Ben and takes you to the Churchill Museum and Cabinet War Rooms.

  • Then put on your airs and graces as you take a stroll through St James Park, visit the Queen at Buckingham Palace and lunch at the Ritz.

  • In the afternoon stroll through the most expensive property on the Monopoly board, Mayfair.

  • Come the evening, take the tube out to Finsbury Park, where you can dine with real Londoners and have 'a pint' at one of London's best pubs, the Faltering Fullback.

In Pictures

" "
Circle & District or Jubilee Line to Westminster Tube Station.Walk past Big Ben and the House of Parliament.Visit The Churchill Museum and Cabinet War Rooms.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
toastbrot81.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
toastbrot81.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
Curtis Cronn.


Visit Westminster Abbey.Stroll around St James park.Tour Buckingham Palace and Gardens.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
William Nicholson.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
UGArdener.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
army.arch.


Lunch The Ritz.Explore Shepherd Market.Avant-guarde fashion at Dover Street Market.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
courtesy of J Whitmarsh.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
0


Experience the disbelief of Abercrombie & Fitch.Picadilly Circus to Finsbury Park StationDine at the Japanese-Korean restaurant Dotori.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
Lolito de Palermo.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
toastbrot81.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
Matt Sephton.


Or Thai restaurant Cats.Finish with a pint at the Faltering Fullback

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
dansette.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
Eric Huang.


"

In Detail

  1. Take the Westminster & City line to Westminster Tube Station.

  2. Walk past Big Ben and the House of Parliament.

  3. Interested in World War II. Visit the Churchill Museuma and Cabinet War Rooms, from where the British Government planned in its strategy against the Nazis.

  4. Then pay a visit to Westminster Abbey, one of London's most famous churches.

  5. Next take a stroll around one of London's finest parks, the regal St James park.

  6. Then call on the Queen! Take a tour around Buckingham Palace and Gardens.

  7. Afterwards, lunch in the elegant surroundings of The Ritz.

  8. Then visit a part of hidden London, Shepherd Market in Mayfair, with its antique shops and gentle ambiance.

  9. Work your way through the monied streets of Mayfair, paying a visit to avant-guarde fashion house Dover Street Market.

  10. Next, following on the fashion tip, take in the unique experience that is Abercrombie & Fitch, a clothes shop with a discotheque ambiance, blacked out windows, staff who look like models and faux dancers.

  11. Finally, for the evening, take the Picadilly Line from Picadilly Station up to Finsbury Park (approximately 20 minutes).

  12. Get a taste of the real suburban London at Finsbury Park. Visit the Japanese-Korean restaurant Dotori or the Thai restaurant Cats. End the night at one of London's finest suburban pubs, the Faltering Fullback

"

On a Map

Morning

Circle & District oir Jubilee to Westminster Tube Station.
Walk past Big Ben and the House of Parliament.
Visit The Churchill Museum and Cabinet War Rooms.
Visit Westminster Abbey.
Stroll around St James park.
Tour Buckingham Palace and Gardens.
Afternoon

Lunch The Ritz.
Explore Shepherd Market.
Avant-guarde fashion at Dover Street Market.
Experience the disbelief of Abercrombie & Fitch.
Evening

Picadilly Circus Tube Station
Finsbury Park Tube Station
Dine at the Japanese-Korean restaurant Dotori.
Or Thai restaurant Cats.
Finish with a pint at the Faltering Fullback



View The Royal, the Real, the Ritz and the Glitz in a larger map


View The Royal, the Real, the Ritz and the Glitz in a larger map


View The Royal, the Real, the Ritz and the Glitz in a larger map

" "

Attractions one by one



Big Ben and the Houses of Parliament (UK Residents)
http://www.parliament.uk/visiting/

Visit the seat of British government! UK residents can get a free tour of Big Ben and the Houses of Parliament through their MP. Overseas visitors can visit the Houses during the summer and Saturdays. Debates and committees can be attended by anyone throughout the year.+

9-5.00, Free, Westminster

Palace of Westminster, City of London SW1A 0AA
;
020 7219 3000
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Katarina Stefanovic. .





Churchill Museum and Cabinet War Rooms
http://cwr.iwm.org.uk/server/show/nav.221

Those with an interest in World War II may be interested to visit the Cabinet War Rooms from where Winston Churchill and the British Government planned their war against the Nazi regime.+

9.30-6.00, Adult 16 Child free, Westminster

Clive Steps, King Charles St, City of London SW1A 2AQ
;
020 7930 6961
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Curtis Cronn. .





Westminster Abbey
http://www.westminster-abbey.org/

The establishment church. It has been the place where British monarchs have been coronated since 1066, the resting place for seventeen monarchs and it has one hell of a Gothic interior. If you love churches, you'll love this.+

9.30-3.30 Mon-Sat, Adults 16, Children 6, Westminter (Circle, District and Jubilee)

20 Dean's Yard, London SW1P 3PA
;
020 7222 5152
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
ESTIOS2011. .





St James Park
http://www.royalparks.gov.uk/St-Jamess-Park.aspx

St James park is a beautiful royal London park, backing on to Buckingham Palace.+

0, Free, Westminster, St James Park

London
;
0
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Stuart Spicer. sadmafioso. Wintersun 24/7. http://www.flickr.com/photos/ego61/3865975578/.





The Royal Mews, Buckingham Palace
http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/default.asp?action=article&ID=31

One of the finest working stables in existence, the Royal Mews at Buckingham Palace provides a unique insight into the department of the Royal Household that provides transport by road for The Queen and other members of the Royal Family. +

11-4.00, Adult 8 Child 5 Family 22, Victoria, Green Park

The Royal Mews, 13 Buckingham Palace Rd, Westminster, London SW1W 1QH
;
020 7766 7302
0


State Rooms, Buckingham Palace
http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/default.asp?action=article&ID=30#tosee

The State Rooms form the heart of the working palace and are lavishly furnished with some of the greatest treasures from the Royal Collection - paintings by Rembrandt, Rubens, Poussin and Canaletto; sculpture by Canova; exquisite examples of Sèvres porcelain; and some of the finest English and French furniture. +

10-7.00 (July-October), Adult 18 Child 10 Family 46, Victoria, Green Park

Buckingham Palace, Buckingham Palace Rd, London SW1A 1AA, UK
;
020 7766 7300
0


The Queen's Gallery, Buckingham Palace
http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/default.asp?action=article&ID=32

The Queen’s Gallery at Buckingham Palace is a permanent space dedicated to changing exhibitions of items from the Royal Collection, the wide-ranging collection of art and treasures held in trust by The Queen for the Nation.+

10-5.00 (April-December), Adult 9 Child 5 Family 23, Victoria, Green Park

Buckingham Palace, Buckingham Palace Rd, London SW1A 1AA, UK
;
(+44) (0)20 7766 7300
0


A Royal Day Out, Buckingham Palace
http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/default.asp?action=article&ID=30#tosee

TThis ticket gives admission to three sites: The State Rooms, the Royal Mews and The Queen's Gallery, Buckingham Palace. Only available23 July - 3 October 2011.+

10-5 July-October, Adult 31 Child 17.50 Family 82, Victoria, Green Park

Buckingham Palace, Buckingham Palace Rd, London SW1A 1AA, UK
;
(+44) (0)20 7766 7300
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Thorsten Becker. .





Afternoon Tea at the Ritz
http://www.theritzlondon.com/tea/reservation-en.html

Afternoon tea in the exquisite setting of the Ritz, London. Get a slice of aristocratic English living at one of London's most celebrated hotels. Includes tea, cake and champagne. Its very popular. Sittings at 11.30am, 1.30pm, 3.30pm, 5.30pm and 7.30pm. Reserve your table 2 days in advance! Jeans and sports shoes are not permitted.+

Afternoon tea menu, Adult/Child 42 upwards, Green Park (Jubilee, Picadilly, Victoria)

150 Piccadilly London, United Kingdom W1J 9BR
;
(0) 20 7493 2687
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Sayaka Toyokawa. courtesy of J Whitmarsh. courtesy of J Whitmarsh. .





Shepherd Market
http://shepherdmarket.co.uk/

A buried treasure in the heart of Mayfair; a handful of narrow alleyways and streets, allowing you to escape momentarily from the mayhem and madness of the rush of the city.+

0, 0, Green Park

Shepherd Market, Mayfair, London
;
0
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Wolfiewolf. .





Dover Street Market
http://www.doverstreetmarket.com/about/

Dover Street market is well worth a visit. Art gallery come clothes shop it contains a number of fashion boutiques for young urban trendies - its well worth a look around if for no other reason than the interesting installations they put together. They also have a nice cafe on the top floor.+

11-6 Mon-Sat, 0, Green Park (Jubilee, Picadilly and Victoria)

17-18 Dover St London W1S 4LT
;
020 7518 0680
0


Abercrombie & Fitch
http://www.abercrombie.co.uk/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/StoreLocator?storeId=12406&catalogId=10901&langId=-1

The most disturbing shopping experience in London. After you have worked your way past the two doormen, whose well defined pecks peek out of from their unzipped jacket of the owner, like a pair of Kangeroo babies, you will find yourself bombarded with music, darkness (no light is permitted in this establishment) and scented air. You will quickly notice that most of the staff are young beauties, selected for their looks and figure, and that up on the balcony on the first floor, there are two dancers whose job it seems is to dance nonchalantly, as if they are chilling out at their local disco. Then when you've finished on that take a look around at the customers - many of whom fit that A&F attractive athletic type - as they stare at their own angelic faces in the many mirrors dotted around. And you might whilst your there, even take a loot at the clothes!+

0, 0, Picadilly Circus (Picadilly, Bakerloo)

42 Savile Row, Greater London W1S 3QG
;
0844 412 5750
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
M.J.S.. .





Dotori
http://maps.google.co.uk/maps/place?cid=5856071344418694585&q=dotori+finsbury+park&hl=en&ved=0CA4Q-QswAA&sa=X&ei=GWF1TZuKIo7hjgfU8qz3Dw

Very popular with the locals, Dotori is a small Japanese/Korean restaurant, buried into a tiny shop space beneath Finsbury Park railway line. Well worth a visit, but make sure you book in advance. +

0, 0, Finsbury Park (Picadilly, Victoria)

3 Stroud Green Rd, London N4 2DQ
;
020 7263 3562
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Matt Sephton. http://www.flickr.com/photos/dharbord/4474392528/http://www.flickr.com/photos/dharbord/4474392528/http://www.flickr.com/photos/dharbord/4474392528/.





Cats
http://cats-cafe-des-artistes.co.uk/

In 2006 Thai food outlets began to appear all over north London. Find out what all the fuss was about by visit Cats. Superb range of sticky sweet and spicey Thai food. Delicious.+

0, See Menu, Finsbury Park (Picadilly, Victoria)

79 Stroud Green Road, London N4 3EG
;
020 7281 5557
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
dansette. .





Faltering Fullback
http://www.sphericalimages.com/falteringfullback/

London's best suburban pub, the Faltering Fullback is hidden in the leafy suburbs of Finsbury Park. The pub features a classic old style pub, a dressed down pool and TV hall for big football games, and a maze like outdoors wooden terrace for smokers. A fantastic place to end a day out in London. Also does great Thai food in the pool and TV hall.+

12-11pm, 0, Finsbury Park (Picadilly, Victoria)

19 Perth Road, London N4 3HB
;
020 7272 5834
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Filip Visnjic. .





" "

0Print off 'text-only version' + map
"

"
Wednesday

London Transformed: Olympic Park and Docklands

  • This tour takes you along the route of the Docklands Light Railway to show you how the landscape of London has been and is being transformed.

  • The Docklands Light Railway is a joy to travel on, the train glides into Canary Wharf on an escalated rail, you get the sensation you are flying into Canary Wharf.

  • However, the tout starts by taking you one thousand years back in time, to the Tower of London, built by the Norman Invader, William the Conqueror.

  • Get a view of the Olympic Stadium, a cup of coffee and some cake at the Greenway Cafe. Enthusiasts may wish to bring a pair of binoculars to get the best view.

  • Move on to Canary Wharf, London's new financial centre, which was built during the 1980s. Take a stroll through the many skyscrapers; do a bit of shopping and visit the Docklands Museum to see how the area has changed.

  • In the evening return to Canary Wharf, for a meal at Camino (Spanish) or Plateau; restaurants with fine food and good views.

In Pictures

" "
Circle or District Line to Tower Hill.Explore The Tower of London.Tower Gateway to Pudding Mill

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
toastbrot81.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
Tiffany Hagler-Geard.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
Steve Chou.


Greenway Cafe with views of the Olympic Park.Pudding Mill to Canary WharfWander the skyscrapers of Canary Wharf.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
Martin Deutsch.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
Steve Chou.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
Katarina Stefanovic.


Traffic Lights @ Westferry Circus.Docklands Museum.Walk around The Isle of Dogs.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
Bex Ross.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
Tom Pine.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
Rodents rule.


Under the Thames via the Greenwich Foot Tunnel.Take the children to the Mudchute Park and Animal Farm.Explore the docks.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
tartalom.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
AAron Metcalfe.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
Ravish London.


Tapas with views of the Thames at Camino.Or French restaurant Plateau.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
watchlooksee.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
textlad.


"

In Detail

  1. Take the DLR at Pudding Mill Lane Station; and visit the Container Cafe. Grab cake and coffee and watch the Olympic Stadium and Park being built before.

  2. Take the DLR to Canary Wharf; watch the businessmen and women going about their business and look up in awe at the height of the skyscrapers. Take in the quirky Traffic Lights Sculpture on Heron Quays roundabout. Visit the the docks.

  3. Visit the The Docklands Museum to find out how much this area has changed in the last seventy years.

  4. If you like a bit of exercise, why not circumnavigate the Isle of Dogs take in the River Thames. You'll see river birds, a post-modern mix of new flats, and one or two exhibits reminding you of the fact that the Isle of Dogs was once used for shipping. If you're feeling particularly adventurous you can go AWOL, and take the Greenwich Foot Tunnel from Island Gardens at the southern most point of the Isle of Dogs.

  5. If you have children, or you like farm animals, you might prefer to visit the Mudchute Park and Farm.

  6. Finish the night off with a meal by the Thames at Camino - a Spanish tapas bar. Or you might prefer French cuisine at Plateau with views from the fourth floor in the heart of Canary Wharf.

"

On a Map

Morning

Take the Circle or District Line to Tower Hill.
Visit The Tower of London.
Take the DLR at Tower Gateway.
Get off at Pudding Mill Lane Station.
Afternoon

Visit the Container Café and View Tube to see the Olympic Park.
Take the DLR to Canary Wharf.
Visit the The Docklands Museum.
Take in the quirky Traffic Lights Sculpture on Heron Quays roundabout.
Walk around the docks.
Farm animals at Mudchute Farm.
Two hour walk around the Isle of Dogs.
Go subterranean: take the Greenwich Foot Tunnel.
Evening

Spanish tapas: Camino.
Or French cuisine at Plateau.



View London Transformed: Olympic Park and Docklands in a larger map


View London Transformed: Olympic Park and Docklands in a larger map


View London Transformed: Olympic Park and Docklands in a larger map


View London Transformed: Olympic Park and Docklands in a larger map

" "

Attractions one by one



Tower of London
http://www.hrp.org.uk/toweroflondon/

Experience one thousand years of British history. The Tower of London was built in 1080, by King William, a Norman invader. In its time nothing as big had ever been seen, and even today it shouts out its presence. It was used as a fortress up until the nineteenth century; and used to house and kill various political prisoners.+

10-4.30, Adult 19, Child 11, Family 52 , Tower Hill; Tower Gateway

London, EC3N 4
;
0844 482 7777
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
jim2302. Tiffany Hagler-Geard. Erik Maldre.





The Container Café, Olympic Park
http://www.theviewtube.co.uk/visit/eat.html

The Container Café is a delightful café, housed in a lime green metal container, facing the Olympic Park construction site. It is a marvellous place to take a coffee and a piece of cake. At the same time you can let your imagination run wild, as the sprawling mudpit that is the Olympic Park building site begins to take shape.+

9-5.00, Free, Pudding Mill Lane

The Greenway, Marshgate Lane, Stratford, Greater London E15 2PJ
;
0
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Martin Deutsch. bowroaduk.





Canary Wharf
0

Loose yourself amongst the glassy giants Canary Wharf is home to the headquarters of major city banks such as Barclays, HSBC and Citigroup. It is built on the site of the West India Docks, the busiest docks in the world in the nineteenth century.+

0, 0, Canary Wharf, DLR

Canary Wharf, West India Quay, Tower Hamlets, London E14 4AL
;
0
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Stu Mayhew.





Docklands Museum
http://www.museumindocklands.org.uk/English/VisitUs/

The Docklands Museum explores the story of London's River, Port and People, from Roman settlement of the port, through to the recent regeneration of London's former Docklands - a 2000 year storyline. The Museum is located over five floors of a splendid late Georgian warehouse on West India Quay- literally in the shadow of Canary Wharf. The galleries show how the docklands region, as well as the River Thames as a whole, has been at the heart of centuries of social and economic change.+

10-6pm, Free, Westferry, West India Quay

West India Quay, 1 Warehouse, Tower Hamlets, London E14 4AL
;
020 7001 9844
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Tom Pine.





Walk around the Isle of Dogs
http://www.ideastore.co.uk/public/documents/PDF/Local%20History/Dockland_Walks_34_2008.pdf

The Isle of Dogs is a curious place. Traditionally a working class area; home of the dock workers. Now the area has a large Bengal population. Add to that the posh flats that are being erected and sold to the businessmen who work in Canary Wharf. The result - young Bengali boys - turn their heads as Porsche's and Lamborghini's roar up and down the streets. It is a quiet place. The international bankers spend their weekends elsewhere. The working class locals do their shopping and go about their life quietly. Its a great place to walk around. You can virtually circumnavigate the whole Island. As you walk west to east, and walk around Canary Wharf, you get the strange experience of feeling like you are walking away from Canary Wharf, but ending up right next to it!+

0, 0, Canary Wharf

0
;
0
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Rodents rule. Ravish London. Chris Wiles Photography.





Mudchute Farm
http://www.mudchute.org/

32 acres of countryside in the middle of the Isle of Dogs to share with friendly fur and feathered creatures. Over 200 animals and fowl on the farm.+

9-5, Free, Mudchute, DLR

Mudchute Park and Farm, Pier St, London E14 3HP
;
020 7515 5901
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Aurelien Guichard. abkeating2000. AAron Metcalfe.





Foot Tunnel to Greenwich
http://www.greenwich-guide.org.uk/tunnel.htm

Although the foot tunnel was built over 100 years ago, it is still a very exciting experience to walk under the River Thames. Its original purpose was to allow south London residents to work in the docks on the Isle of Dogs. The tunnel takes you from the Isle of Dogs to Greenwich.+

0, 0, Island Gardens, DLR

Island Gardens
;
0
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
tartalom.





Walk around the Docks
http://www.ideastore.co.uk/public/documents/PDF/Local%20History/Dockland_Walks_34_2008.pdf

In the 19th century the Isle of Dogs was turned into dockyards and became an important centre for trade. However following the end of the Second World War, London ceased to be a port city, and the docklands fell into disrepair. In the late 1980s the docklands were redeveloped into a financial centre, and the docks have been tidied up and become home to bankers, restaurants and cafes.+

0, 0, Heron Quays, Canary Wharf, DLR

0
;
0
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Angelina Borisova.





Traffic Lights Exhibit
0

To uninitiated motorist the traffic lights exhibit can provoke mild heart attack; to the rest of us it’s a little bit of fun, a fantastic analogy for how life has come to rely on some super-complex automated systems.+

0, 0, Heron Quays, Canary Wharf, DLR

0
;
0
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Bex Ross.





Camino Restaurant
http://www.camino.uk.com/canarywharf

Camino is a Spanish Tapas Bar on the bank of the Thames. It is possible, depending on the times, to get a boat (Thames Clipper) from central London direct to the restaurant, at the Canary Wharf Pier.+

12-3; 6-11, See Menu, Canary Wharf, DLR

28 Westferry Circus, London E14 8RR
;
020 7239 9077
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
watchlooksee.





Plateau Restaurant
http://www.plateau-restaurant.co.uk/

Plateau does Mediterranean food, and is situated on the 4th floor, amongst the Canary Wharf financial centre.+

12-3, 6-10.30, Mon-Sat, See Menu, Canary Wharf, DLR

Canada Place, Canada Square, London E14 5ER
;
020 7715 7100
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
textlad.





" "

0Print off 'text-only version' + map
"

"
Thursday

Living it up in London's West End!

  • Start the day off at the British Museum.

  • Be astounded by the sleaze, brothels, drama queens and celebration of homosexuality in Soho.

  • Leicester Square for a taste of carnival and fun.

  • Street performers and shopping in 'tourist central' also known as Covent Garden.

  • Take High Tea at Fortnum and Mason's.

  • Take in a West End musical!

In Pictures

" "
Tube to Goodge Street, Russel Stree, Holborn or Tottenham Court RoadInspect the cultural wonders plundered by the British Empire at the The British MuseumStreet acts and boutique shopping in Covent Garden.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
toastbrot81.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
Katarina Stefanovic.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
Katarina Stefanovic.


Sex shops, drag queens, gay bars and cafes in Soho.Coffee and pastry at Maison Bertaux.Peking Duck and all the rice you can eat in China Town.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
Stuart-Lee.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
Ciao.UK.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
Chris Longhurst.


All the fun of the fair and big cinemas in Leicester Square.High Tea at Fortnum and Masons

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
Constant Reader.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
suzysue.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
Auntie P.


Visit the historic Princess Louise for a pint.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
chrskovgaard.


"

In Detail

  1. Get the Northern Line to Goodge Street or Tottenham Court Road, Central Line or Picadilly Line to Holborn.

  2. Walk to The British Museum to view mummies, tombs, the Rosetta Stone and artefacts from around the world.

  3. Take a coffee break in the British Museum coffee, a beer at the Princess Louise.

  4. Browse the boutique stalls and watch the street performers in Covent Garden.

  5. Pass through Soho and get an eyeful of hypersexualised promiscuous London; gay, bi and straight all parade their stuff down here. Whilst you're there take a coffee and a pastry at Madam Bertaux.

  6. Next door to Soho is the colourful China Town - try cripsy Peking Duck!

  7. Then have a wander around the carnivalesque atmosphere of Leicester Square where young people like to meet to make passes at each other. Has several cinemas if you fancy watching a film.

  8. If you're feeling tired after all this walking, then head towards Fortnum and Mason for a traditional English High Tea (I.e. tea and cakes).

  9. Then go and see London's best musical, the Lion King at the Lyceum, just a short walk away.

  10. If you've still got the energy, round the night off with a beer in the Princess Louise or at London's upmarket jazz clubs Ronnie Scotts.

"

On a Map

Morning

Tube to Tottenham Court Road, Holborn, Russel Square or Goodge Street.
Ancient relics in the British Museum.
Afternoon

Streetperformers, shops and restaurants in Covent Garden.
Pubs, clubs & shops for gays, bis and straights in Soho.
Coffee at one of London's oldest patisseries, Maison Bertaux.
Smells, sights, sounds and Peking Duck in China Town.
All the fun of the fair and big cinemas in Leicester Square.
Evening

Fortnum and Mason for High Tea.
Lion King at The Lyceum.
English beer in a traditional pub at Princess Louise.
Jazz at Ronnie Scott's.



View Living it up in the West End! in a larger map

" "

Attractions one by one



British Museum
http://www.britishmuseum.org/the_museum.aspx

The British Museum holds a world revered collection of historical and cultural artefacts. Key items include the Elgin Marbles from the Parthenon in Greece; the Rosetta Stone from Ancient Egypt inscribed with a decree issued in three scripts, which provides the key to the modern understanding of Egyptian hieroglyphs.+

10-5.30, Free, Russel Square, Holborn, Tottenham Court Road, Goodge Street

Great Russell St, City of London WC1B 3DG
;
020 7323 8000
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Alessandro Morandi. Katarina Stefanovic.





Covent Garden
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Covent_Garden

Covent Garden is 'tourist central'. Whilst most places in Central London are heavily populated by tourists - Covent Garden is where they reach their greatest concentration. For this reason, you can find plenty of boutique stores, street entertainers and a general buzz about the place most days of the week.+

0, 0, Covent Garden, Tottenham Court Road

Covent Garden, London
;
0
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Alessandro Morandi.





Soho
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soho

London nights and sex. Whether your gay, bi or straight if you want to peruse the meat markets, get some action and have money to burn, then head straight here. Clubs and pubs in galourous.+

0, 0, Tottenham Court Road

Dean Street, Soho, London
;
0
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Stuart-Lee.





Maison Bertaux
http://www.maisonbertaux.com/

Maison Bertaux is a pâtisserie, founded in 1871, which also houses the Maison Bertaux Theatre Club, which performs within the tiny confines of the shop.+

0, 0, Tottenham Court Road, Leicester Square

28 Greek St, London W1D 5DQ
;
020 7437 6007
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Ciao.UK.





China Town
http://www.chinatownlondon.org/

Although its only been in existence since the 1970s, today China Town commands the attention of all those who pass through it. Although relatively small in size, China Town consists of several streets full of restaurants, herbal medicine shops and the like; and its principal stree, Gerrard Street, is now the site of several pretty pagodas. +

0, 0, Leicester Square

Gerrard St, London W1D 6JN
;
0
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Zebtan.





Leicester Square
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leicester_Square

Leicester Square is the closest you will get to the typical garish British seaside resort - just without the seaside. Cinemas, rides, pubs and amusement arcades. Full of young starry eyed tourists. It is a meeting point for the capital's biggest flirts.+

0, 0, Leicester Square

Leicester Square
;
0
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Constant Reader.





Fortnum and Mason - Afternoon Tea
http://www.fortnumandmason.com/afternoontea.aspx

Enjoy afternoon tea at St James Restaurant in Fortnum and Mason's, recently targeted by UK Uncut protestors for alleged tax-dodging.+

12-6.30, Menu, Picadilly Circus; Green Park

181 Piccadilly, London W1A 1ER, United Kingdom
;
0845 602 5694
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
incredible how. sista_tif.





The Lion King
http://www.london-theatreland.co.uk/theatres/lyceum-theatre/theatre.php

The Lion King is undoubtedly the most talked about London musical, enjoyed by young and old alike. +

Tues - Sat 7.30pm,Wed, Sat and Sun 2/3pm, From 26 each, Covent Garden

21 Wellington Street, London WC2E 7RQ
;
44 (0) 20 7492 1548
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Mairi Nolan.





Princess Louise
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Princess_Louise_%28pub%29

The Princess Louise is a historic public house in High Holborn famous for its remarkable interior, with its wood panelling and series of 'booths' around an island bar. It tends to be a favourite of professors and academics, given its proximity to the University of London.+

12-11, 0, Holborn

208 High Holborn, City of London WC1V 7EP
;
020 7405 8816
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Rudy Osorio. Matthew Black. chrskovgaard. kelpenhagen. GeoY5.





Ronnie Scotts
http://www.ronniescotts.co.uk/

Ronnie Scott's jazz club is over fifty years old, and has become an institution in Soho. The original owner died a while back, and in some sense the original spirit of the club too, but it is still very popular, people go to eat and drink, whilst listening to music.+

6-3, 27.5, Leicester Square, Tottenham Court Road

47 Frith St, Westminster, London W1D 4HT
;
020 7439 0747
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Mulia. Veronique Dubois. inkamack.





" "

Print off 'text-only version' + map
"

"
Friday

Shopping in London!

  • Spend your whole day shopping!

  • First visit Oxford Street, Britain's most famous shopping mile!

  • For the British shopping experience try Selfridges, John Lewis, Marks and Spencer, Debenhams, Urban Outfitters and Hamleys.

  • For top fashions Diesel, Banana Republic, UNIQLO, Top Shop, GAP and Desigual.

  • For bargains try Primark.

  • And don't forget to check out the Apple Store on Regent Street.

  • Then take the tube from Marble Arch to Portobello Market in Notting Hill.

In Pictures

" "
Tube to Oxford Circus or Bond StreetShopping in Oxford StreetUrban Outfitters

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
toastbrot81.


GAPJohn LewisUNIQLO

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
Joshua Willis.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
Fat Les.


DebenhamsDieselSelfridges

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
Kip.


Marks and SpencerPrimark StoresShopping in Regent Street

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
Nick D.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
SHOOTO.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
Ken Douglas.


Apple StoreBanana Republic Desigual

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
Damian Ward.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
Rusty Lindsay.


HamleysExclusive shopping on Bond Street.Portobello Market

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
Alisonabra.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
Phil Wright.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
Eastcliffe.


Jimmy ChooTop Shop

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
Ginny Carrot.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
Nani Brunini.


"

In Detail

  1. Get the Bakerloo, Central or Victoria Line to Oxford Circus; or the Nothern Line to Tottenham Court Road, or the Jubliee Line to Bond Street.

  2. Take in all the big shops on Oxford Street including Primark, Marks and Spencer, Selfridges, T|op Shop, Diesel, Debenhams, UNIQLO, John Lewis, Urban Outfitters and GAP.

  3. Take in the shops on Regent Street including Apple Store, Banana Republic, Desigual and Hamleys.

  4. Exclusive shopping for rich people on Bond Street.

  5. Don't forget the crazy experience that is Abercrombie and Fitch.

  6. In the afternoon, take the tube from Marble Arch to Notting Hill, where you can visit Portobello Market.

"

On a Map

Morning

Tube to Oxford Circus or Bond Street.
Oxford Street
Regent Street
Bond Street
Primark
Marks and Spencer
Selfridges
Top Shop
Diesel
Debenhams
UNIQLO
Afternoon

John Lewis
Urban Outfitters
GAP
Apple Store
Banana Republic
Desigual
Hamleys
Evening

Abercrombie and Fitch
Take tube to Marble Arch
Visit Portobello Market
Or visit Camden Market



Shopping in London!


View Shopping in London in a larger map

" "

Attractions one by one



Oxford Street
http://www.oxfordstreet.co.uk/

Come worship at the high temple of consumerism. Oxford Street is London's big shopping street, location for the flagship stores of hundreds of top brands and high street names. An agoraphobic's nightmate, Oxford Street is one of the biggest concentration of people in the UK. For those who want to experience something British try John Lewis, Marks and Spencer, Selfridges, Top Shop and Debenhams.+

10-7; 12-6 (Sun), 0, Oxford Circus, Bond Street

Oxford Street, London
;
0
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Ravish London






Regent Street
http://www.regentstreetonline.com/

Regent Street, is in many respects, a sidestreet off London's premiere shopping street, Oxford Street. Its distinctive curve, which seems to taper to a point, is a sight to behold, designed for the ostentatious Prince George in the nineteenth century, as a processional way from Buckingham Palace to Regent Park. These days Regent Street is best known for the fact that it hosts the Apple Store flagship store - a strange blend of shop and community centre.+

0, 0, Oxford Circus, Picadilly Circus

Regent Street, London
;
0
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Paul Anthony.





Bond Street
http://www.bondstreetassociation.com/flash.html

If Oxford Street is shopping for your common man and woman (and quite frankly it isn’t – its shopping for the middle classes and for common men and women hooked on credit card debt) then Bond Street is shopping for your toffee nosed elites – the ones who don’t want to mix with the middle classes – or any classes for that matter.The shops on Bond Street are mainly fashion and jewellers.+

0, 0, Bond Street, Oxford Circus

Bond Street, London
;
0
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Phil Wright.





Primark
http://www.primark.co.uk/

"Perhaps the most stressful shopping experience of my life, but well worth it!" This quote sums up Primark perfectly. Well known for offering great clothes very cheaply! If you want bargains come here. On the other hand be prepared to be pushed, jostled if not wrestled to the ground and given a good beating. +

8.30-10; 12-6 (Sun), 0, Marble Arch, Bond Street

499-517 Oxford St, London W1C 2QQ
;
020 7495 0420
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
SHOOTO.





Marks and Spencer
http://www.marksandspencer.com/

Marks and Spencer, a middle class British institution owned by Jews, is a purveyor of good food and middle of the range clothes.+

0, 0, Marble Arch, Bond Street

458 Oxford St, London W1C 1AP
;
020 7935 7954
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Nick D.





Selfridges
http://www.selfridges.com/

Selfriges is arguably the jewel in the crown of Oxford Street; it is an incredible feast of fine clothing and perfumes. Once in the store you are bombarded by sounds, smells, staff who look you up and down and some very glamorous shoppers. Definitely worth a visit.+

9.30-9, 12-6 (Sun), 0, Marble Arch, Bond Street

400 Oxford Street, London W1A 1AB
;
0800 123 400
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):






Top Shop
http://www.topshop.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/TopCategoriesDisplay?storeId=12556&catalogId=33057

Top Shop is the choice of clothes shop for millions of women and girls across the UK; young, fresh and affordable.+

0, 0, Bond Street

Oxford Circus, 36-38 Great Castle Street, Greater London W1W 8LG
;
0
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Nani Brunini.





Diesel
http://www.diesel.com/

Diesel has some stunning window arrangements, and is worth visiting just for the way they arrange their wares. Sells designer clothing, jewellery and other nik-naks.+

10-6; 12-6 (Sun), 0, Bond Street

400 Oxford Street, London W1C 1JS
;
0
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):






Debenhams
http://mystore.debenhams.com/store/75-London-Oxford-Street

Debenhams is Department Store shopping for your middle classes. Conspicuous for the fact that it has no character.+

9.30-8; 12-6 (Sun), 0, Bond Street

334-348 Oxford Street, London, W1C 1JG
;
08445 616 161
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):






UNIQLO
http://www.uniqlo.com/uk/store/311_oxford_street_london_flags.html

UNIQLO is Japan's top clothing retailer. It tends to see casual items in a range of bright colours. Its displays like rainbows. Has 2 stores on Oxford Street, one at 170 and the flagship store at 311.+

10-9; 11.30-6 (Sun), 0, Bond Street and Oxford Circus

311 Oxford Street, London W1C 2HP
;
020 7290 7701
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Fat Les.





John Lewis
http://www.johnlewis.com/Shops/DSContact.aspx?Id=23

If you want the quintessential British Department Store it has to be John Lewis. Its flagship store a temple to consumerism. John Lewis is held dear to the heart of the British public for the fact that it is a co-operative, the company is owned by its employees, who share equally in bonuses.+

9.30-8; 12-6 (Sun), 0, Bond Street and Oxford Circus

300 Oxford Street London W1A 1EX
;
020 7629 7711
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):






Urban Outfitters
http://www.urbanoutfitters.co.uk/page/home/

Urban Outfitters cater for the Radiohead side of the fashion market, retrospective, boutique, smart scruff, nonchalant, didn't bother with my clothes today but still look cool as fcuk.+

10-8; 12-6 (Sun), 0, Bond Street and Oxford Circus

200 Oxford Street, London W1D 1NU UK
;
0207-907-0800
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):






GAP
http://www.gap.eu/browse/info.do?cid=46525

GAP sells clothes for a young trendy market with little pretention or imagination.+

9.30-9.30, 12-6 (Sun), 0, Oxford Circus

376-384 Oxford Street, London W1C 1JY
;
0207 408 4500
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Joshua Willis.





Apple Store
http://www.apple.com/uk/retail/regentstreet/

The Apple store was an an incredible innovation in IT store design when it first opened in 2006. The open plan layout, the way the store encouraged you to handle and use its products, the free lectures and demonstrations, the staff who walk around the store like foremen looking for problems to solve. The whole thing created a cult-like following overnight composed mainly of young people & adults. Whilst the novelty of this approach has since worn off somewhat, for first-timers and out-of-towners its well worth a visit.+

9-9; 12-6 (Sun), 0, Oxford Circus

235 Regent Street London, W1B 2EL
;
020 7153 9000
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Damian Ward.





Banana Republic
http://maps.google.co.uk/maps/ms?ie=UTF8&hl=en&msa=0&msid=207785391828941123857.00049ff26153b91101980&ll=51.515166,-0.140505&spn=0.004634,0.011587&z=16&iwloc=00049ff27b1d95597a150&lci=transit_comp

American chain store, very popular with the ladies, selling dresses and the like.+

10-8; 12-6 (Sun), 0, Oxford Circus

224 Regent Street, London, W1B 3BR
;
020 7758 3550
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Rusty Lindsay.





Desigual
http://storelocator.desigual.com/index.php?idioma=en&pais=GB&poblacion=London

Colourful bohemian hippy styles are offered in abundance at Desigual. They seem to be keen to capture that Spanish style, often seen sported by the young files of Barcelona.+

0, 0, Oxford Circus

218 Regent Street, London,
;
0207 494 3773
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):






" "
Hamleys
http://www.hamleys.com/Regent_Street_Store_|_Hamleys_Toys/Store_Page_0001,default,pg.html

Hamleys is every child's dream. Several floors packed full of every toy you could imagine and some you could not.+

10-8; 12-6 (Sun), 0, Oxford Circus

188-196 Regent Street London, W1B 5BT
;
0871 704 1977
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Chris Dotson.





Abercrombie & Fitch
http://www.abercrombie.co.uk/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/StoreLocator?storeId=12406&catalogId=10901&langId=-1

The most disturbing shopping experience in London. After you have worked your way past the two doormen, whose well defined pecks peek out of from their unzipped jacket of the owner, like a pair of Kangeroo babies, you will find yourself bombarded with music, darkness (no light is permitted in this establishment) and scented air. You will quickly notice that most of the staff are young beauties, selected for their looks and figure, and that up on the balcony on the first floor, there are two dancers whose job it seems is to dance nonchalantly, as if they are chilling out at their local disco. Then when you've finished on that take a look around at the customers - many of whom fit that A&F attractive athletic type - as they stare at their own angelic faces in the many mirrors dotted around. And you might whilst your there, even take a loot at the clothes!+

0, 0, Picadilly Circus (Picadilly, Bakerloo)

42 Savile Row, Greater London W1S 3QG
;
0844 412 5750
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
M.J.S.. .





Portobello Market
http://www.portobellomarket.org/howtogetthere.htm

Portobello Market is a delightful array of nick-nacks, fruit and veg and British memorabilia; mostly laid out for the tourist market. The market itself is based on the wealthy Notting Hill district, site of the famous Notting Hill Carnival.+

9-6.00, 0, Ladbroke Grove, Westbourne Park

325 Portobello Road, Kensington, Greater London W10 5
;
0
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Chris White; Michel Bo Petersen; Daniel Kasaj; Ravish London.





Camden Market
http://www.camdenlock.net/

Camden Market is the place to go for alternative fashion. It hosts several markets, all of which are located along Camden High Road. The clothes are EMO, Goth, Punk, Rock and even Army Surplus, depending on your want. You can also find DM shops, hemp gear, and plenty of t-shirts with lewd and sexually suggestive messages on them. Its great fun, but beware, their are countless pickpockets ready to pounce on tourists who have been lulled into a false sense of security. To maximise safety, get out of this place before the sun goes down.+

11-6.00, 0, Camden

188 Camden High St, Camden Town, Greater London NW1 8
;
0
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Pete Zelewski; Dave Wilcox; Graham F Kerr; Graham F Kerr; Graham F Kerr.





" "

Print off 'text-only version' + map
"

"
Saturday

Torture, Food and Drink!

  • Start the morning off with a gut churning visit to London Dungeons or the London Bridge Experience!

  • Then onto the food experience of your life at Borough Market.

  • Take a traditional pub lunch enjoying some of the high quality fare from Borough Market.

  • Antiques, boutiques and an afternoon coffee in Angel.

  • Then big night out in Camden the rock n roll centre of London!

In Pictures

" "
Tube to London BridgeVisit the London DungeonsOr the London Bridge Experience

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
toastbrot81.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
oozzkkann.


The Shard, Europe's tallest building.London's premiere food market Borough MarketTube to Angel

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
Michali Konstandinidis.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
andykirby79.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
toastbrot81.


Antiques, furniture and fashio in Camden PassageBoutiques, coffee bars and cake shops in Upper StreetAfter a rest in the hotel, tube to Camden

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
mcfarlandmo.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
Linda Cronin.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
toastbrot81.


Night out in Camden!Dublin CastleHawley Arms

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
pentaxhugh.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
0

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
Jules 3000.


MonarchWorlds EndElephants Head

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
wildblanket.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
Matteo Prezioso.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
Rocker_44.


Camden UnderworldKokoJazz Cafe

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
Alex Grant.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
enamic5.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
Kathleen Degiorgio.


BarflyRoundhouse

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
solamore.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
Neil Henderson.


"

In Detail

  1. Get the Northern Line, Jubilee Line or overground to London Bridge.

  2. Take a look at the gruesome way in which Londoners used to treat its prisoners and enemies in The London Bridge Experiencet or The London Dungeon. This one is not for the feint hearted or squeemish!

  3. Then in the late morning have a look and sample some of the best food and drink that London has to offer at London's premiere food market Borough Market..

  4. Then take the tube from London Bridge to Angel where you can rub shoulders with real Londoners and browse amongst the antiques, boutiques and coffee shops in Camden Passage and Upper Street.

  5. After shopping retire to your hotel, before getting ready for the big night out in Camden Town the hub for rock n roll and live acts in London. Pubs include The Hawley Arms, The Monarch, The Elephants Head, The Dublin Castle, The Worlds End. Venues include The Camden Underworld, The Jazz Cafe, Koko and The Roundhouse.

  6. Round the night off with a kebab!

"

On a Map

Morning

Tube or train to London Bridge.
London Dungeon
London Bridge Experience
The Shard
Borough Market
Afternoon

Angel Tube Station
Camden Passage Antiques
Upper Street
Evening

Camden Tube Station
Dublin Castle
Hawley Arms
The Monarch
The World's End
The Elephant's Head
The Electric Ballroom
Camden Undeworld
Koko
Jazz Cafe
Barfly
Roundhouse



View Torture, Food and Drink in London Town! in a larger map


View Torture, Food and Drink in London Town! in a larger map


View Shopping in Angel in a larger map


View A Night out in Camden in a larger map

" "

Attractions one by one



London Dungeon
http://www.thedungeons.com/london/en/plan-your-visit/opening-times.aspx

London Dungeon features several shows and two rides, and allows visitors to find out about the more macabre side to London life.+

10-5.00, Adult 21 Child 16 Family 73, London Bridge

The London Dungeon, County Hall, Westminster Bridge Road, London, SE1 7PB
;
0871 423 2240
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
thechillking.





London Bridge Experience
http://www.thelondonbridgeexperience.com/faq.asp

The London Bridge Experience takes visitors on a journey back through history, including the Vikings, the Romans and the Great Fire of London which occurred in 1666. Includes a trip into the London Tombs, which used to be the resting place for people who died from the Plague. Designed to scare!+

10-6.00, Adult 23 Child 17 Family 74, London Bridge

London Bridge Experience, 2-4 Tooley Street, City of London SE1 2PF
;
0844 847 2287
0


The Shard
http://the-shard.com/shard/explore-the-shard/about-the-shard

The Shard, on completion, will be the tallest building in Western Europe and contain restaurants, the 5-star Shangri-La hotel, residential apartments and the capital's highest viewing gallery offering 360° views. For now it is worth keeping an eye out for.+

0, 0, London Bridge

96 Tooley Street, City of London SE1 2TH
;
0
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
stugee. 3





Borough Market
http://www.boroughmarket.org.uk/page/3020/Visit+us

Borough Market is a food lovers delight. You can find the best produce London has to offer in this place. Breads, meats, vegetables, fish and fine ales and wines. An ideal place to buy a present for one's loved ones back home.+

Thu-Sat; 11-5, 0, London Bridge

239 Borough High Street, Camberwell, Greater London SE1 1
;
0
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Sam Beddoes.





Camden Passage Antiques
http://www.camdenpassageislington.co.uk/

Camden Passage is a pedstrianised passage of Upper Street comprising shops, arcades, malls, and markets. Main market and trading days are Wednesdays and Saturdays. But many shops open weekdays or by arrangement.+

0, 0, Angel

12 Camden Passage, London, NW1 8ED
;
0
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
gareth1953.





Upper Street
0

Upper Street is a main shopping centre for the well-heeled of north London. It consists trendy bars, restaurants, boutiques and furniture shops. It is frequently a meeting point for lovers and groups of women. It also has a cinema and several small theatres.+

0, 0, Angel

Upper Street, London, NW1
;
0
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
pollyblue.





Dublin Castle
http://www.facebook.com/thedublincastle

The Dublin Castle is a friendly pub, which hosts bands, notably Madness during the 1980s and the Libertines in more recent years.+

0, 0, Camden

94 Parkway, London NW1 7AN
;
020 7485 1773
0


Hawley Arms
http://www.thehawleyarms.co.uk/

The Hawley Arms is frequented by some of the most beautiful young people in Camden, and is a famous haunt of Amy Winehouse. Has a two bars, one downstairs, one upstairs and a roof terrace.+

0, 0, Camden (Northern Line), Camden High Road (Overground)

2 Castlehaven Road, London NW1 8QU
;
020 7428 5979
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Jules 3000.





The Monarch
http://www.monarchbar.com/

The Monarch is a spacious Camden pub, which frequently features guest DJs and bands. Check out for its advertising board on the street for original witty remarks.+

0, 0, Chalk Farm and Camden (Northern Line); Kentish Town West and Camden High Street (Overground)

40-42 Chalk Farm Road, Greater London NW1 8BG
;
020 7482 2054
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
jadeeey.





Worlds End
http://www.theworldsend.co.uk/

Worlds End is a vibrant cavernous pub; a definite must for all those travelling to Camden for the first time. A frequent meeting place for goths and hard core rockers; its often a stopping off point for people on their way to the Underworld.+

0, 0, Camden (Northern Line)

174 Camden High Street, London, NW1 0NE
;
020 7482 1932
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Deep Ghosh.





Elephants Head
0

Elephants Head is a great place to have a beer on a Saturday evening. On Saturday evenings it usually has a crowd of hardened Rockabilly types, mostly men, but a scattering of women too, hungry for Ska and Northern Soul.+

0, 0, Chalk Farm and Camden (northern Line)

224 Camden High Street, London NW1 8QR
;
020 7485 3130
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Juan Ribon.





The Electric Ballroom
http://www.electricballroom.co.uk/clubnights/clubnights.html

The Electric Ballroom is a huge venue, started off as an Irish club, but now hosts bands from pop to rock. Only venue in central London, where you can experience a Saturday night atmosphere like you get in a provincial English town. Tacky pop, lots of leg and high heels turning over.+

0, 0, Chalk Farm and Camden (Northern Line)

184 Camden High Street, London NW1 8QP
;
020 7485 9006
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Mad_T.





Camden Undeworld
http://www.theunderworldcamden.co.uk/gigs/

The Camden Underworld is a smallish venue with a huge history. Is popular with the teens and usually puts on rock, punk and indie bands. Also hosts several discos.+

0, 0, Camden Town (Northern Line)

174 Camden High Street, City of London, Greater London NW1 0NE
;
020 7482 1932
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Snowtown.





Koko
http://www.koko.uk.com/listings

Koko is aesthetically speaking the best venue in Camden, based in an old 1920s theatre, with Gaudiesque balconies. It also hosts some of the best bands around.+

0, 0, Mornington Crescent (Northern Line)

1a Camden High Street, London NW1 7JE
;
0870 432 5527
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Hannah Daisy.





Jazz Café
http://venues.meanfiddler.com/jazz-cafe/listings

The Camden Jazz Café does exactly what you'd expect, hosting contemporary jazz and soul acts from classic to old school and contemporary fusions. Also boasts a restaurant. But beware! Before you pay big money for tickets, check out the latest reviews on the internet!+

0, 0, Camden Town (Northern Line)

5 Parkway, London NW1 7PG
;
020 7485 6834
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Simon Fernandez.





Barfly
http://www.barflyclub.com/camden/whatson/listings/club.aspx

The Barfly is a gold old dark and dingy indie and alt rock venue, with a couple of floors. A great place to end up at the end of the night.+

0, 0, Chalk Farm and Camden Town (Northern Line)

49 Chalk Farm Road, London NW1 8AN
;
020 7688 8994
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Laura Harvey Photography.





"
Roundhouse
http://www.roundhouse.org.uk/whats-on

The Roundhouse, a former railway engine shed, is a ginormous venue, hosting performance arists and concerts, featuring high end bands that cost a fair bob to go and see.+

0, 0, Chalk Farm (Northern Line)

49 Chalk Farm Road, London NW1 8AN
;
0844 482 8008
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Polly Thomas.





0000 "

Print off 'text-only version' + map
"

"
Sunday

Flowers, Markets, Curry and Beer

  • Start your Sunday off with a stroll through Columbia Road Flower Market and a morning coffee!

  • If you have children take them to Hackney City Farm.

  • Then wander south into Spitalfields, whose architecture is inspired by the French immigrants who arrived here in the 18th Century, which has hosted French, Jewish and Asian communities down the years.

  • Rummage through Sunday markets located in Spitalfields, Brick Lane and Petticoat Lane.

  • Visit Dennis Severs House and find yourself transported back to the 17th Century, to the age of the French Hugeunot weaver.

  • Visit London's coolest record shop, Rough Trade East, which regularly hosts bands, sells plenty of vinyl and boasts a café.

  • Visit Whitechapel Gallery for the art.

  • Finally, go Asian, Jewish or Cool, by taking a curry, beigel or barbecue at Truman's Yard down Brick Lane.

In Pictures

" "
Tube to Liverpool Street or Old Streeat, Overground to Shoreditch High StreetSweet aromas and morning coffee at Columbia Road Flower Market.Take the children to Hackney City Farm

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
toastbrot81.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
Jay Bergsen.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
centeno.


Across the canal to a microcosm of trendiness at Broadway MarketClothes & fabrics at Petticoat Lane MarketCorporate dining and trendy nick-nacks at Spitalfields Market

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
Jeremy Walker.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
leaseoflife.


Bangladesh meets urban cool down the legendary Brick Lane.Stolen bikes, single shoes and broken phone chargers - you can find it all down Brick Lane MarketGet a beigel from the legendary 24 hour Beigel bakery a remant from when Jews made Brick Lane their own.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
james_rawimages.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
Adam Thompson.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
Stefan Schafer.


Take a glimpse at the French Hugenot architecture in Spitalfields the closest London has to a French quarter.Let your imagination run wild at Dennis Severs House home of an old French Hugeunot Weaver.Urban art at Whitechapel Art Gallery

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
Anne Clements.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
Keira Vallejo Photography.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
smieczk.


Trendy clothes, beers and music shops at Truman Yard - just off Brick Lane.Flick through the vinyl at London's coolest record shop Rough Trade EastDo your duty and get a curry in one of Brick Lane's curry houses.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
Double Feature.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
Nigel Rumsey.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
roboppy.


Go for a beer at the Vibe Bar.93 Feet East.The Big Chill Bar.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
fsm vpggru.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
Dean Ayres.


Get the tube back home from Aldgate East.

Photo Credit (top left clockwise):
toastbrot81.


"

In Detail

  1. Take the Underground to Liverpool Street or Old Street, or the London Overground to Shoreditch High Street.

  2. Rise and shine for Columbia Road Flower Market an explosion of colour, smell and Cockney Banter.

  3. If you have children, or if you are a child at heart take a walk to Hackney City Farm and be as happy as a pig in mud.

  4. If you don't have children you may want to take a wander up and down Broadway Market a microcosm of trendiness set deep in the heart of grim Hackney.

  5. Otherwise take a stroll down into Spitalfields where you can visit Spitalfields market, Brick Lane market and Petticoat Lane market all a stones throw from each other.

  6. At the same time you can take in the atmosphere of the legendary Brick Lane and Truman Yard, where urban cool and street art meet Bengalis, curry and Islam. Or take in the French architecture and tranquility of Spitalfields back streets and visit Dennis Severs House a mock-up of a French Hugenot weaver's house from the 18th century.

  7. Art lovers may care to take a trip down to Whitechapel Art Gallery.

  8. You have to have a very good reason not to have a curry in one of the many Brick Lane curry houses.

  9. Finally, finish off your night idling the hours away in one of the many Brick Lane bars, including Vibe Bar, 93 Feet East and The Big Chill.

  10. Whatever activities you choose, this has got to be the best way to spend a Sunday in London!

"

On a Map

Morning

Tube to Liverpool Street or Old Street. Overground to Shoreditch High Street.
Up early for Columbia Road Flower Market.
Pigs, hens and cows at Hackney City Farm.
Afternoon

Lunch at Broadway Market.
Or beigel in Brick Lane.
Stroll down the legendary Brick Lane.
Take a stroll down Brick Lane and rummage through the bric-a-brac on offer in the Sunday market.
Investigate Dray Walk for clothes, records and burgers.
Including London's coolest record store, Rough Trade East.
Upmarket fashion accessories and corporate dining at Spitalfields market.
Cheap clothes and fabrics at Petticoat Lane market.
Take a walk around the back streets of Spitalfields.
Book a visit to Dennis Severs House.
Pop down to Whitechapel art gallery.
Evening

Go vindaloo at one of Brick Lange's many curry houses.
Wash your curry down with a beet at The Vibe Bar.
Or the The Big Chill Bar.
Or 93 Feet East.
Back home via Aldgate East.



View London Sunday: Flowers, Markets, Curries and Beer in a larger map

" "

Attractions one by one



Columbia Road Flower Market
http://columbiaroad.info/

Columbia Road Flower market is a beautiful fusion of colour, smells and Cockney banter. You need to get up reasonably early to get to the market as it finishes at 3. There's a host of coffee bars and boutique stalls around the market. Due to the crowds and the narrow street, the pace is slow and reflective - just what you need on a Sunday morning!+

Sun, 8-3.00, 0, Hoxton Train Station

3 Ezra St, Londres E2 7RH
;
0
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Anastasia_A.





Hackney City Farm
http://www.hackneycityfarm.co.uk/

Hackney City Farm features cows, goats, pigs and hens to name but a few, and is great fun for children and arguably even more fun for adults. Its free and is open for most part of the day from Tuesday to Sunday and Bank holidays.+

10-4.30pm Tue-Sun, Free, Hoxton

1a Goldsmith's Row, City of London E2 8QA
;
020 7729 6381
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
spektograph.





Broadway Market
http://www.broadwaymarket.co.uk/

Broadway Market is the name of a street and the market on the street. It is a microcosm of trendy bohemian London living, buried into the otherwise urban & industrial wilderness of Hackney. To those who known London, it almost seems like a colony of the types that live in Shoreditch. You will find uber-trendies, organic shops, cafes and bars, street art and even a fish and chip shop. The market, specialising in food, is open Saturday, but if you are in the area it is still worth passing through, just to see the shops and absorb the atmosphere.+

Market Sat; 9-5; Shops open all week, 0, Haggerston (London Overground); Bethnal Green (Central Line)

Broadway Market, Hackney, E8
;
0
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Jeremy Walker.





Petticoat Lane Market
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petticoat_Lane_Market

Petticoat Lane Market is a down to earth clothing market, manned mostly by Asian-turned-Cockneys, where you can buy cheap clothes and beautiful African and Indian fabrics. It has a real history, originally being a Jewish market. The banter is still the same, you'll still here, "Alright darling?' everywhere, but now its more likely to be a Bengali than a Jewish barrowboy.+

10-2pm Sun-Fri, 0, Aldgate East

Middlesex Street, Poplar, London E16BD
;
0
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
2create.





Spitalfields Market
http://www.oldspitalfieldsmarket.com/markets-in-london.html

Spitalfields market is open seven days a week and specializes in records, clothing, food, art and antiques depending on the day. The Sunday market specializes in upmarket and vintage clothing, is a good place for fashion lovers and is generally one of the busier days.+

10-4pm, 0, Liverpool Street

16 Horner Square, City of London EC1 6EW
;
020 7247 8556
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
_foxy_.





Brick Lane
http://www.visitbricklane.org/

Brick Lane is a cross roads of Bengali culture, working class bric-a-brac and urban cool, although the first two seem to be giving away to the latter. The north end of Brick Lane features bars, beigel shops, restaurants and vintage clothing. Tthe southern end is exclusively curry houses, a mosque and a Bengali supermarket. Enjoy a curry in sometimes less than salubrious surroundings and fend off the incessant attentions from restaurant salesmen speaking the least intelligible English you are likely to find in London. Brick Lane is also a site for street art.+

0, 0, Shoreditch High Street, Liverpool Street

Brick Lane, London
;
0
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Aleina.





Brick Lane Market
http://www.sundayupmarket.co.uk/

Brick Lane market takes place on a Sunday. It is a curious affair, combining trendy and vintage clothes stores, with second hand furniture and bric-a-brac. Sometimes you will find a person pawning their worldly goods, which could include old trainers and mobile phone chargers which don't appear to have much hope of working. There's also a brisk trade in cycles and cycle parts, which rumour has it, are mostly stolen. There are also two indoor markets The Backyard Market (Sat, Sun) and Sunday Up Marketboth focussed on fashion and design.+

Sunday, 9-5, 0, Shoreditch High Street, Liverpool Street

Brick Lane, London
;
0
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Simona Tonna.





Brick Lane Beigel Bake
0

Brick Lane Beigel Bake is an institution selling beigels twenty four hours a day. It is often the last port of call for revellers looking to line their stomache after a hard night's drinking in the East End. Equally it makes a good pit stop for someone looking for a cheap takeaway lunch. Try the all time favourite salt beef and mustard, or for best value you can have chopped herring.+

0, 0, Shoreditch High Street, Liverpool Street

Brick Lane Beigel Bake, 159 Brick Lane, Spitalfields, E1
;
020 7729 0616
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
bellaphon.





Spitalfields
http://www.ravishlondon.com/Spitalfields/

Spitalfields has one of the richest histories in London, and is well worth a look around. Of special note is the French architecture; Spitalfields was once home to a commnity of French weavers, who fled Catholic persecutors, in the 18th Century. The weavers' houses still survive today, and form some of the most picturesque and oddly continental style streets that you will find in London. Try Folgate Street (with its brick surface), Dennis Severs House, Fournier Street, Princelet Street and Fashion Street. For a few minutes you find yourself away from the hubbub and in a sea of tranquility.+

0, 0, Liverpool Street

Spitalfields, London, E1
;
0
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
_foxy_.





Dennis Severs House
http://www.dennissevershouse.co.uk/

In the 17th Century French Protestants fled France for fear of persecution by the French Catholics. Some ended up in the East End of London and settled in Spitalfields. Dennis Severs' house, an old weaver's house, stands testament to this time. The interior is arranged exactly as one would expect it in the 17th Century. But beware, this is not so much a museum, as an opportunity to nourish your imagination. The aim of visiting this place is not to understand, but instead to immerse yourself in the sights and sounds of another world and time, to see if you can, for just an hour, transport yourself from contemporary life and dive into the world that Severs’ house offers up to you. Book in advance and strictly no talking allowed! +

Mondays and Sundays, 5-8 per person, Liverpool Street

18 Folgate St, City of London E1 6BX
;
020 7247 4013
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Keira Vallejo Photography.





Whitechapel Art Gallery
http://whitechapelgallery.org/

Whitechapel Art Gallery puts on a range of contemporary at exhibitions and exhibitions focussed on the East End of London.+

11-6pm Tues-Sun, Free, Aldgate East

77-82 Whitechapel High Street, City of London E1 7QX
;
020 7522 7888
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
smieczk.





Dray Walk
0

Truman Yard is a side road of Brick Lane, which hosts a number of designer clothes shops, bars and Rough Trade East, London's best record shop. It is particularly renowned for the big barbecue that it puts on every afternoon and evening, where you can take a hot dog and a beer, sit down and people watch.+

0, 0, Shoreditch High Street, Liverpool Street

Truman Yard, Brick Lane, E1
;
0
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Lars Bortfeldt.





Rough Trade East
http://www.roughtrade.com/site/about.lasso

Rough Trade East was an ostentatious attempt to revive the flagging fortune of record stores, which took off in 2007. It combines cafe, internet surfing, t-shirts and fashion with gigs and vinyl and CDs everywhere. It has a real feel good factor, it feels like a hub, a place where things happen, take for example the notice board crammed with requests for vocalists, drummers and guitarists. The spirit of the record shop lives on here.+

11-7 Mon-Sun, 0, Shoreditch High Street, Liverpool Street; Aldgate East

Rough Trade East, 'Dray Walk', Old Truman Brewery, 91 Brick Lane, London, E1 6QL
;
0
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Nine Inch Nilina.





Brick Lane Curry
0

Curry, like tea, is one of those Asian commodities, which is now every bit as British as it is Indian or Bengali. And Brick Lane is arguably the place to come to get the ultimate London curry experience. No-one can walk down Brick Lane without being harassed by one of the several vendors eager to get you inside, with a version of English, which is barely comprehensible. The only problem you have is which restaurant to choose. Most of the places serve good stuff, so everything else being equal, the question is what type of table you get and what the interior is like. If you like barterting this is the place to do it, you can usually get a good twenty to thirty per cent off, if you've got a reasonable number of people. +

0, 0, Shoreditch High Street, Liverpool Street

Brick Lane, London
;
0
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
roboppy.





Vibe Bar
http://www.vibe-bar.co.uk/

The Vibe Bar is a colossal building with four separate rooms and a large courtyard, which often has a barbecue set up. It is perfect for grabbing a bite to eat, a beer and doing what people in Brick Lane like doing best, people watching!+

11-late, Mon-Sun, Free*, Shoreditch High Street, Liverpool Street

91 Brick Ln, London E1 6QL
;
020 7247 3479
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
fsm vpggru.





The Big Chill Bar
http://www.bigchill.net/bar/info

The Big Chill Bar is one of the many places 'to be seen' in Dray Walk just outside Brick Lane. It has a stripped down feel to it, and always has DJs in view, giving it a sense of 'this is where its happening', this is where the next new thing is about to rear its head. Forever busy.+

Sun-Sat, 12-12, Free*, Shoreditch High Street, Liverpool Street

Dray Walk, London, E1 6QL
;
020 7392 9180
Photo Credits (top left clockwise):
Dean Ayres.





93 Feet East
http://www.93feeteast.co.uk/diary/

93 Feet East is another one of the multi-room mega bars in Brick Lane, which also boasts a courtyard. Puts on concerts.+

Mon-Sun 5-late, Free*, Shoreditch High Street, Liverpool Street

150 Brick Lane, London, E1 6QL
;
0207 770 6006
0


" "

Print off 'text-only version' + map
"